Government auctions, held by a local school district, police department, city hall or county administrations, occur when a government entity has surplus, unwanted or unneeded items. Everything from office furniture to overhead projectors and unclaimed bicycles may be found at government auctions. In some locales, auctions are held once or twice a year, while some organizations may hold auctions more frequently. Scan your local free weekly newspaper for news of upcoming government auctions, or look at the bulletin boards in local government buildings where public information is posted. Police auctions sometimes include vehicles and luxury items seized during arrests; these auctions are often advertised in local newspapers or by searching online for local government or police auctions.
Do your research. Check Kelly Blue Book for the proper price for the vehicle, including its mileage and apparent condition. Always downgrade the condition by one ranking for government auctions. Also, do some smart used-car research, such as checking Consumer Reports for reliability and the frequencies of particular repairs, and checking our road test information if it's a recent model vehicle.
The General Service Administration is the biggest national sales agency and you can check out fleet sale cars and trucks on their website. Online versions of the auction can be located through the GovSales website. Finding former police cars for sale is down to how often those local auctions are held, but you can also try eBay Motors. Government car auctions are there in the motors section for you to search through. You can search by ZIP code, type of car, miles from your destination or make and model of the car you require.
Depending on the agency, the government may use revenue from auctioned items to support crime-prevention programs, pay restitution to crime victims or purchase new equipment the department needs. "By providing agencies with the ability to dispose of excess assets, GSA benefits taxpayers by eliminating the need to maintain and store the unneeded property while also raising more than $300 million in revenue in just the last two years," a GSA spokesperson said.
Various federal, state, and local government and law enforcement agencies, (as well as banks and lending institutions) regularly auction off thousands of cars and SUV's. These cars are often sold for a fraction of their retail value, sometimes as much as 90% off book value, and hence can allow you to purchase a vehicle a great saving, or even get a luxury car that you might otherwise be unable to afford.
Servicing Allen Park, Beverly Hills, Birmingham, Bloomfield Hills, Bloomfield Township, Brighton, Canton, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, Ferndale, Eastpointe, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Grosse Pointe, Grosse Ile, Highland Park, Huntington Woods, Ypsilanti, Lathrup Village, Lincoln Park, Livonia, Monroe, Madison Heights, Milford, New Hudson, Northville, Novi, Oak Park, Orchard Lake, Pontiac, Redford, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Romulus, Roseville, Royal Oak, Southfield, Troy, Taylor, Southgate, Van Buren Township, Ecorse, Inkster, River Rouge, Garden City, Riverview, West Bloomfield, and Wyandotte, Michigan.

Non profits groups must be classified as tax exempt under section 501(c) of the United States tax code and possess a current business license issued from the licensing authority in your state.  The intent of sales to non profits is that no one individual is to profit from the purchase.  By participating in this sales process, you are attesting that your purchase of this equipment is intended for the use of the nonprofit organization. The State of Alaska reserves the right to suspend sales to non profit organizations violating this clause.
This site advertises auctions of seized Real Property for sale throughout the United States and Puerto Rico and includes single and multi-family residences; commercial and residential land; commercial buildings and warehouses; and operating businesses. These properties have been seized and forfeited due to violations of federal laws enforced by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Participating enforcement agencies include: IRS-Criminal Investigations Division, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the U.S. Secret Service. All proceeds from the sale of property are deposited in the U.S. Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund. This fund helps support continued law enforcement efforts and provide restitution to crime victims.
Prior to July 1, 2012, the Boulder campus's surplus property program operated as a “designated off-site disposal facility” in accordance with Colorado Surplus Property HB 06-1075 Procedures for Higher Education, as agreed upon by Colorado Correctional Industries (CCI) and the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.  In 2011, C.R.S 17-24-106 was amended to exclude institutions of higher education from the requirements of CCI's surplus property program.  This policy formally establishes authority for administering the campus' surplus property program and outlines requirements for the program to help ensure that the institution meets its fiduciary responsibilities. 

Kathy Adams is an award-winning journalist and freelance writer who traveled the world handling numerous duties for music artists. She writes travel and budgeting tips and destination guides for USA Today, Travelocity and ForRent, among others. She enjoys exploring foreign locales and hiking off the beaten path stateside, snapping pics of wildlife and nature instead of selfies.
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