Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Please be advised that you may experience a short wait time. Please also be advised that there may be some instances where the Property and Evidence staff may be called away from the Safety and Justice Building to assist with off-site support for crime scene investigations. If this happens on the day of your appointment, we apologize in advance. Please schedule a new appointment.
APPOINTMENTS: Property is released by appointment only beginning December 1, 2017. There is no charge to sign up on Eventbrite. Our switch to a reservation system better serves our community with shorter wait times. Be sure keep track of your appointment time confirmation emailed to you. We recommend that you print this out or have it available on a mobile device. The time you have reserved is on the lower half of the ticket. We cannot take residents for a time in which you have not been scheduled.
Internet auctions typically last seven days, and operate like eBay auctions. Each listing links to the auction house website where bids can be placed. From that site, bidders are asked to register in order to bid on a vehicle. Live auctions are public auctions held at a specific date and location and are usually published in newspapers in addition to the online listing at GovSales.
Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information
The links below are police seizure, government surplus, and towing/wrecker impound auctions around the state of Texas. All of these are open to the public. These auctions are held less frequently than typical public auto auctions in Texas. Tow and police auctions are usually held monthly or quarterly. Visit the website for the auction you are interested in for more information on vehicle inventory and when the next auction will be held. Be sure to visit the website before contacting the auction because the information you need may already be provided.
Payment methods. A government auction accepts many modes of payment from credit cards or bank checks to cash. It is recommended to ask the auctioneer about the modes of payment involved before the auction starts. Besides the bidding price of the car, an additional buyer's premium fee is added onto the total. This fee is normally 5 percent of the winning bid
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